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Ellen DeGeneres Show star Sophia Grace Brownlee gives birth to first child



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llen DeGeneres Show star Sophia Grace Brownlee has announced that she has given birth to her first child.

The 19-year-old UK influencer – who shot to fame over a decade ago after a video of her and her cousin Rosie McClelland performing Nicki Minaj‘s Super Bass went viral and caught the attention of the US chat show host – took to Instagram on Sunday to share the happy news and give fans a first-look at her adorable son.

Uploading a black and white close up of the new arrival’s dinky hand holding her finger, she wrote his date of birth as the caption.

It read: “26.02.23,” followed by a white heart emoji.

DeGeneres was among the first to comment on the post, writing: “Welcome to the world, Nicki Minaj the 3rd!”

Brownlee’s 16-year-old cousin McClelland wasn’t far behind, gushing: “I love him so much already,” along with a blue heart emoji.

She is unlikely to share a picture of the tot’s face anytime soon, explaining in a YouTube video last month: “I don’t want to show my baby’s face as first when he’s born until I feel ready to. Maybe in a couple of months after he’s born, I will feel like I’m ready.”

The Essex-born star first announced that she was pregnant back in October via a video on her YouTube Channel.

Tutu-wearing Sophia Grace and her cousin Rosie McClelland shot to fame a decade ago on The Ellen DeGeneres Show

/ Getty Images

“I’m sure a lot of you are going to be very shocked because it probably was quite unexpected,” she admitted in the video.

Adding: “I was very shocked when I first found out. I’ve gotten used to it now and I’m super, super, happy about it.”

She revealed then that she already knew her baby’s gender and showed off images from her scan along with her 21-week baby bump.



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